Filed under: Swellbeing

Your wellbeing as an adult tied to your childhood and high school friendships

Having good friendships and relationships as a child and teenager, and taking part in social activities such as youth groups and sporting clubs, is linked to greater wellbeing as an adult — more so than early language development and academic achievements in high school (these being linked to one’s socioeconomic status) — so social networks trump socioeconomic class when it comes to wellbeing. The study is published in the current issue of Journal of Happiness Studies.

(Image: MyFlashTrash)

Leave a Comment August 8, 2012

How awesomeness affects us

When I think of awe-inspiring moments in my life — I’m talking about jaw-dropping occasions — my trip last August to Rwanda for an article I wrote for Elle Canada about a the SmartGirls initiative between Because I’m a Girl and SmartWater Canada comes to mind. From the excited, happy children so thrilled to see us in their little village to the safari we went on, where we saw hippos, giraffes and more, roaming freely, and so many more moments (too many to mention — but definitely the great group of women I was traveling with played a big part), I still feel overwhelmed with emotion and am grateful I had the chance to experience it.

Awesomeness has a profound effect on us, it seems. In a new study conducted by researchers in Stanford University and University of Minnesota, it seems that these awe-inspiring moments make us feel as though we have more time and make us more patient, less materialistic and more willing to volunteer to help others. It does this by bringing us into the present and thus influencing our decisions, affecting our perception of time and it makes us feel that life is more satisfying.

Here’s to more awesomeness all around.

And more picnic lunches with giraffes. That was totally awesome.

2 Comments July 23, 2012

Enjoy an aperitivo

(A glass of wine and some local cheeses — in fact, the server pointed in the direction of the town where the cheese came from when he described the choices to me — with a view of Pallazzo Pitti in Florence.)

One of my favourite things about my recent trip to Italy? Aperitivo. A pre-dinner drink so you can relax and whet your appetite for dinner? Sign me up. This was one local tradtition I had no problem incorporating into my daily schedule as soon as I arrived (and I’ve continued with the habit somewhat since returning home).

So this new research finding is particularly welcome:

Moderate drinking (that’s defined as one per week and no more than three daily for women) is linked to a higher quality of life compared to those who don’t drink at all.

Salute!

Leave a Comment June 26, 2012

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